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marlondog
11-27-2008, 04:13 PM
Yesterday I installed the trd rear sway bar, and I have to say that I'm inpressed. However, I tightened the bolts to the point that felt that going any further would break the bolts. Is this what is meant by factory specs, or should I buy a torque wrench and loosen or tighten the bolts according to toyota?

Tamago
11-27-2008, 04:16 PM
Yesterday I installed the trd rear sway bar, and I have to say that I'm inpressed. However, I tightened the bolts to the point that felt that going any further would break the bolts. Is this what is meant by factory specs, or should I buy a torque wrench and loosen or tighten the bolts according to toyota?

what do you think?


60-80 lb/ft is actually not very tight at all.. if you put them on THAT tight you'll just be hating life later when you try to remove the lug nuts.

the torque spec is to allow the bolt to utilize some of its internal strength for supporting the vehicle rather than being stretched by the mechanical force of a too-tight lug nut

out of curiosity, why did you remove your wheels to install a rear swaybar?

marlondog
11-27-2008, 04:34 PM
How do you know that I took the wheels off the vehicle? Did i say I did?Huh,Huh? I did so cuz that is the only way to have extra space in the wheel well. That's why. Besides, you have the bolt of the shock going one way,and you have to install the included bolt the other way. Now I didnt tighten them to the point that I was shaking and grunting. I tightened them till it felt useless to continue tightening. My original question was if I need to get a torque wrench to tighten or loosen the bolts to factory specs? Stay on board with me on this one!:respekt:

Tamago
11-27-2008, 04:41 PM
if you have steel wheels it's not that big of a deal.. otherwise i say spend the $20 from harbor freight

marlondog
11-27-2008, 04:53 PM
Thanks buddy!

WeeYari
11-27-2008, 04:57 PM
I was prepared to torque when I did my sway bar, but I could not get a torque wrench in there without removing the wheels. Basically said screw that, and tightened by feel with a box wrench.

marlondog
11-27-2008, 04:59 PM
So long as it is tight and it ain't wiggling, it's all good! Right?:laugh:

Tamago
11-27-2008, 05:19 PM
haha lol i just realized what you were asking... dumb blonde moment for me. just tighten the swaybar bolts TIGHT and you're fine :)

jkuchta
11-27-2008, 05:43 PM
So long as it is tight and it ain't wiggling, it's all good! Right?:laugh:



Well...yes and no. If its pretty close to the correct torque, you should be fine. If it's too loose or too tight, then the bolts could brake. Too much torque will cause the bolt to yield too muchwhich will cause the bolt to stretch and loosen, and too little torque could cause just enough wiggle room for vibrations or sudden loads to shear the bolt head off.

My vote is to invest in a good torque wrench (remember, you get what you pay for) and torque every bolt you install or loosen on the car to spec. It may be a little anal, but it's worth it.

MUSKOKA800
11-28-2008, 10:48 AM
Tightened my sway-bar bolts by hand with spanner and ratchet. As no lock washers were provided I used some medium loc-tite on the threads for security. I didn't remove the wheels but rather put it up on ramps for ease of access from the rear.

Loren
11-28-2008, 11:33 AM
I installed mine with the wheels in place AND the car on the ground. :iono:

If you're a somewhat experienced mechanic and can answer the question "how tight is tight" for any given bolt, you can get by without a torque wrench on stuff like this. I own two torque wrenches, but I didn't use one on this because I know it's not "critical" and it just needs to be "tight".

Things I always torque: wheels, critical engine parts (head bolts, connecting rod bolts, stuff like that), brake caliper mounting bolts (don't ask me why), front strut-to-hub bolts. Anything that's "mission critical" and likely to either come loose from undertorque or break from undertorque, I use a torque wrench on.

marlondog
11-28-2008, 10:01 PM
I installed mine with the wheels in place AND the car on the ground. :iono:

Well good for you,dude!:headbang:

If you're a somewhat experienced mechanic and can answer the question "how tight is tight" for any given bolt, you can get by without a torque wrench on stuff like this. I own two torque wrenches, but I didn't use one on this because I know it's not "critical" and it just needs to be "tight".

So I don't need one then? Goodie-Goodie!

Things I always torque: wheels, critical engine parts (head bolts, connecting rod bolts, stuff like that), brake caliper mounting bolts (don't ask me why), front strut-to-hub bolts. Anything that's "mission critical" and likely to either come loose from undertorque or break from undertorque, I use a torque wrench on.
Muchos Gracias, Don Loren!

facebreaker1212
11-29-2008, 12:26 AM
I always just use the German torque specification...

Just turn it til it's Guten Tight!!!

Ha ha, another one is to tighten it til it breaks, then back it off a quarter turn...lol.

nsmitchell
05-05-2009, 09:14 AM
Torque on lug nuts is critical.

I thought I needed new brake rotors because when stopping my rotors felt warped.

I rotated my tires the other day, and the lug nuts were on way too tight. Some felt like king kong had tightened them! Apparently the dude who put my new tires on over-torqued them, warping my rotors.

After rotating my tires and putting proper torque - 76ft/lb the rotor no longer feels warped! Im so happy. :thumbup: Also use anti-sieze compound on your lug nuts and studs and you will never shear them off.

Moral of the story - Always check your lug nut torque after any tire/wheel service. :thumbsup: Buy a good torque wrench!

severous01
05-05-2009, 10:30 AM
you should also tighten all lugs by hand or lightly until all lugs touch the wheel and make the wheel touch the rotor. then go into a star pattern. this will stop the rotor warping issue.

just to give you an idea of how important lug tightening is, the new corvet has a 4 step process you MUST follow. tighten all by hand, then tighten to 50 then 75, and finally to 120. if someone comes in and they find out that lugs werent tightened to spec they're fired. the car was designed to hit 215mph and if someone is happening to go that fast and a wheel falls off....they're dead no matter how lucky they are.

nsmitchell
05-05-2009, 03:54 PM
you should also tighten all lugs by hand or lightly until all lugs touch the wheel and make the wheel touch the rotor. then go into a star pattern. this will stop the rotor warping issue.

just to give you an idea of how important lug tightening is, the new corvet has a 4 step process you MUST follow. tighten all by hand, then tighten to 50 then 75, and finally to 120. if someone comes in and they find out that lugs werent tightened to spec they're fired. the car was designed to hit 215mph and if someone is happening to go that fast and a wheel falls off....they're dead no matter how lucky they are.
By hand with a torque wrench, right? Some places use torque sticks on impact wrenches. Do they friggin work? Do they just not use the right ones? I may just start bringing my torque wrench and asking them if I can torque them or at least have them use my torque wrench.

Loren
05-05-2009, 03:57 PM
I'm a big fan of hand-torquing, but I've had people that I trust tell me that the torque-sticks are very accurate when used properly.

(the same can be said of a torque wrench, or any other tool, really... only as good as the user)

severous01
05-05-2009, 10:45 PM
i use torque sticks on other ppl/s cars. i use a wrench on mine. of course i get paid by the hour for others and i dont get paid at all for mine. i've never had a prob with tq sticks and until u drop them or hit them they should hold up.

yes to start by hand and then use a CALIBRATED wrench

Creeper
05-06-2009, 01:38 AM
most shops iv been in, unless the customer is there, no torque. just zap zap zap zap go

MUSKOKA800
05-06-2009, 01:53 PM
most shops iv been in, unless the customer is there, no torque. just zap zap zap zap go


EXACTLY!
then a short time later you're back to have the warped rotors corrected.
Cha-Ching!!!

nsmitchell
05-06-2009, 03:24 PM
Next time I get tires, I'm going to ask the guy immediately after my car is ready, what torque did you take my lug nuts too? (wait for an answer) I'll say if it's not 76ft/lb then you better get them to that torque right now before my rotors warp while I watch! Here, use my torque wrench. (made by Snap-On and calibrated and always set to 15lb/ft after each use)

Eatoman
10-18-2010, 01:22 PM
I bought a torque stick from Jet Tools that's good for 80ft/lb. Would this torque stick work well on my 14" steelies? What's the best way to use a torque stick?
Thanks!

severous01
10-19-2010, 05:18 PM
80 is fine...as long as you didnt get the 150lb one.

also, if you are using the stick and gun, lightly hit the gun to touch lugs to wheels. then go back a second time and tighten with teh stick/gun combo to prevent the rotor warping issue.

if you seat the wheel firmly first you shouldnt have any problems...but think about what happens when you tighten one side before all the others...it leans that way, then you pull it back the other way with the other 3 lugs...pulling the bearing/hub/rotor with it