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Old 04-10-2018, 02:42 PM   #19
Kaotic Lazagna
 
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Aww, no love lost! lol

I like those cars a lot, just not something I'd get into myself. Yours is beautiful, no doubt about it.
lol, I was just messing with ya. It's not a car for everyone, especially for those who want to go fast in a straight line.



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That's more what I meant, to stay on the engine swap topic.

https://www.autoevolution.com/news/w...ne-109455.html
lol, hard pass on that. I'd rather stick a 2JZ in it.
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Old 04-10-2018, 02:45 PM   #20
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So, which would you take? 86 with GR-R power plant, or Ferrari power plant? You've seen that car, right?
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Old 04-10-2018, 02:49 PM   #21
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They've achieved over 1000hp at the wheels with that 86 GTR. I wonder if you could beat that with a twin engine Yaris hehe
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Old 04-10-2018, 05:25 PM   #22
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So, which would you take? 86 with GR-R power plant, or Ferrari power plant? You've seen that car, right?
I like the sound of the VR38 over the Tuerck's GT4586.

But both engine swaps are just not worth it imo unless you had the crazy funds those people have. Tuerck already has some 2JZ 86's in his stable, so I can see why he wanted to think outside the box.
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Old 04-10-2018, 05:26 PM   #23
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They've achieved over 1000hp at the wheels with that 86 GTR. I wonder if you could beat that with a twin engine Yaris hehe
Depends on which engines you can make work with a twin engine, awd Yaris.
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Old 04-11-2018, 11:04 AM   #24
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I like the sound of the VR38 over the Tuerck's GT4586.

But both engine swaps are just not worth it imo unless you had the crazy funds those people have. Tuerck already has some 2JZ 86's in his stable, so I can see why he wanted to think outside the box.
Absolutely not worth it. Total engineering achievement with tons of cool factor and that's about it lol.
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Old 04-12-2018, 01:08 PM   #25
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After rolling with the new system for a while, I've discovered a problem. I've always gotten rear view mirror vibration from my sound systems, but it seems the Yaris' rear view mirror is more loose than the average. Instead of just vibrating around a bunch when the bass hits, this thing is literally moving down and to the left, making it impossible to use.

Any bright ideas for ways I can stop it from moving without permanently fixing it? And yes, yes I do realize the ridiculousness of this request and I love it even more so because of it
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Old 04-12-2018, 03:01 PM   #26
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Weird, mine is pretty sturdy, lots of body parts falling off due to too much bass, but never had a mirror go out of adjustment. Maybe yours been played with too many time in his life and isn't as stiff as it used to. Maybe a few drops of superglue in the lip between the mirror and the ball mount to kind of give it something to hold it set a little more ?
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Old 04-12-2018, 03:28 PM   #27
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Weird, mine is pretty sturdy, lots of body parts falling off due to too much bass, but never had a mirror go out of adjustment. Maybe yours been played with too many time in his life and isn't as stiff as it used to. Maybe a few drops of superglue in the lip between the mirror and the ball mount to kind of give it something to hold it set a little more ?
That was my initial thought but then I assume it'll be stuck permanently in that position.

My other thought was some high quality silicon caulk. That could always be pulled off if needed.
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Old 04-12-2018, 04:58 PM   #28
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Won't get stuck forever with just a few drops on the exterior.
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Old 04-12-2018, 08:25 PM   #29
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ern-diz, are you running this system off the stock alternator? I'm wondering as I'll be starting my installation in 5 - 6 weeks. I have a 4 x 100 amp and an underseat 100 watt subwoofer and am wondering if I'll have enough juice without overstressing the alternator.
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Old 04-12-2018, 10:05 PM   #30
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100w sub ? That's not a lot.

Unless you run the 4 channels on the amp to full power, I wouldn't stress the alternator.

Before doing my auxiliary battery setup, I was running my 300w RMS underseat powered sub off the car and the alternator wasn't complaining. Only when I was running my 1000w microwave on the inverter that it sounded suspicious.
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Old 04-13-2018, 06:13 AM   #31
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100w sub ? That's not a lot.

Unless you run the 4 channels on the amp to full power, I wouldn't stress the alternator.

Before doing my auxiliary battery setup, I was running my 300w RMS underseat powered sub off the car and the alternator wasn't complaining. Only when I was running my 1000w microwave on the inverter that it sounded suspicious.
Yeah, the sub, an NVX QBus8v.2, is 100 watts RMS and 200 peak. I don't expect I'll be cranking the system up very high, but I don't think there is much headroom in the alternator after everything else in the car is supplied. I was looking at a 140 amp alternator, just not sure I'd really need it. I've also been looking at big 3 kits.

Would you mind elaborating on a bit on your auxiliary battery setup?

Thanks
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Old 04-13-2018, 09:00 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by 06YarisRS View Post
Yeah, the sub, an NVX QBus8v.2, is 100 watts RMS and 200 peak. I don't expect I'll be cranking the system up very high, but I don't think there is much headroom in the alternator after everything else in the car is supplied. I was looking at a 140 amp alternator, just not sure I'd really need it. I've also been looking at big 3 kits.

Would you mind elaborating on a bit on your auxiliary battery setup?

Thanks


The Yaris has an alternator powerful enough for your needs, unless you already have other accessory loads. To make sure you get the most out of your system, you should clean and grease the post clamp on the battery as well as the bus bar connections, ground point, etc. Use a torque wrench to achieve specified torque on each bolts as to not over tighten. Battery post clamps are 5.4Nm in the Yaris btw, if you go more, you simply keep on crushing the soft metal of the posts and clamps till there's no room left for the clamp to close tighter.

As for an auxiliary battery setup, I decided to go with a deep cycle group 27 battery, which is about $200 for a decent one. You could go with a smaller one such as a 26 or 35 (same as the engine bay one) or in between with a 24. It's really up to your budget, space and how much power you'll draw. A battery capacity is measured in Ah, which is the total amps the battery can output for 20h without waste. So a 100ah battery can give you up to 5a per hour for 20h straight without significant waste. More draw will result in thermal waste and lower your overall reserve, such as a 10a draw will last less than 10h. Less draw will achieve a longer run time. There's also the battery internal resistance that come into play, again the lower the better, and the more expensive. Another rating commonly found is the reserve time, or capacity, usually "RC". It's the specified duration in minutes that a fully charged battery will be able to supply a 25a draw before reaching a low voltage threshold of 10.8v This rating is uses as to determine the reserve capacity of a car battery in case of alternator failure, which an average operating load of 25a on a regular driven car. In your application as an auxiliary battery, you'll be looking at both the Ah and RC, since cold cranking amps won't affect your setup. A deep cycle battery has the ability to recover to full health from an almost complete depletion of its cells, but usually has lower cranking power than regular batteries, despite better Ah and RC specs.

Now, you'll want to wire your auxiliary battery in parallel to your main battery, and use either a manual switch, a battery isolator or relay or an automatic charging relay, so you can separate both batteries when the car is not running to prevent them from killing each other trough voltage equalizing phenomenon. On my setup I have both a manual switch and an automatic charging relay in parallel of the switch. Since it's easy to forget to turn the switch on or off, an automatic charging relay senses voltage on both battery and combines them if it detects a higher voltage on one or both sides, meaning a charge is being given (such as the alternator giving about 14v) and isolate both battery if one of them drops below a set threshold such as 12.7v. Mine also have an ignition disconnect feature meaning when I crank the engine, the relay automatically disconnect the batteries to prevent cranking power flowing from the auxiliary battery. Its simply a 12v input that you wire from the black wire in your ignition key switch. I have the small Blue Sea ACR and a marine battery switch.

Next you'll need a battery tray to hold the battery and a stable footing for the battery. I placed mine behind the driver seat, fix the tray on a 1/2" plywood board that runs the full width of the car. Make sure to get a sturdy tray to prevent the battery from tipping or breaking loose in case of impact. If buying a lead acid battery, beware of gases being generated when the battery receives a charge, however these are small in the application. It's more about preventing explosive situation rather than intoxication, unless you enclose the battery, then you'll need a venting tube to prevent any accumulation of gases. If you choose an AGM battery, Absorbent Glass Mat, then there's no liquid and no gases being generated. They also have superior performance and life cycle, but are more expensive.

Next you'll want a fuse block to properly dispatch power to your equipment. Don't forget a ground bus bar with a properly sized grounding wire and a proper ground point to minimize voltage drop. I usually try to avoid grounding to the frame when I install new equipment, I'd rather close the loop back at the bus bar to insure the least resistance.

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Old 04-13-2018, 11:01 AM   #33
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06YarisRS - to answer your question, yes, running the stock alternator. Haven't had a problem with any 1-2 amp systems I've ran in any of my cars.

David C - That is one clean install, my friend.
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Old 04-13-2018, 07:51 PM   #34
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[quote=David C;811700]The Yaris has an alternator powerful enough for your needs, unless you already have other accessory loads. To make sure you get the most out of your system, you should clean and grease the post clamp on the battery as well as the bus bar connections, ground point, etc. Use a torque wrench to achieve specified torque on each bolts as to not over tighten. Battery post clamps are 5.4Nm in the Yaris btw, if you go more, you simply keep on crushing the soft metal of the posts and clamps till there's no room left for the clamp to close tighter.

As for an auxiliary battery setup, I decided to go with a deep cycle group 27 battery, which is about $200 for a decent one. You could go with a smaller one such as a 26 or 35 (same as the engine bay one) or in between with a 24. It's really up to your budget, space and how much power you'll draw. A battery capacity is measured in Ah, which is the total amps the battery can output for 20h without waste. So a 100ah battery can give you up to 5a per hour for 20h straight without significant waste. More draw will result in thermal waste and lower your overall reserve, such as a 10a draw will last less than 10h. Less draw will achieve a longer run time. There's also the battery internal resistance that come into play, again the lower the better, and the more expensive. Another rating commonly found is the reserve time, or capacity, usually "RC". It's the specified duration in minutes that a fully charged battery will be able to supply a 25a draw before reaching a low voltage threshold of 10.8v This rating is uses as to determine the reserve capacity of a car battery in case of alternator failure, which an average operating load of 25a on a regular driven car. In your application as an auxiliary battery, you'll be looking at both the Ah and RC, since cold cranking amps won't affect your setup. A deep cycle battery has the ability to recover to full health from an almost complete depletion of its cells, but usually has lower cranking power than regular batteries, despite better Ah and RC specs.

Now, you'll want to wire your auxiliary battery in parallel to your main battery, and use either a manual switch, a battery isolator or relay or an automatic charging relay, so you can separate both batteries when the car is not running to prevent them from killing each other trough voltage equalizing phenomenon. On my setup I have both a manual switch and an automatic charging relay in parallel of the switch. Since it's easy to forget to turn the switch on or off, an automatic charging relay senses voltage on both battery and combines them if it detects a higher voltage on one or both sides, meaning a charge is being given (such as the alternator giving about 14v) and isolate both battery if one of them drops below a set threshold such as 12.7v. Mine also have an ignition disconnect feature meaning when I crank the engine, the relay automatically disconnect the batteries to prevent cranking power flowing from the auxiliary battery. Its simply a 12v input that you wire from the black wire in your ignition key switch. I have the small Blue Sea ACR and a marine battery switch.

Next you'll need a battery tray to hold the battery and a stable footing for the battery. I placed mine behind the driver seat, fix the tray on a 1/2" plywood board that runs the full width of the car. Make sure to get a sturdy tray to prevent the battery from tipping or breaking loose in case of impact. If buying a lead acid battery, beware of gases being generated when the battery receives a charge, however these are small in the application. It's more about preventing explosive situation rather than intoxication, unless you enclose the battery, then you'll need a venting tube to prevent any accumulation of gases. If you choose an AGM battery, Absorbent Glass Mat, then there's no liquid and no gases being generated. They also have superior performance and life cycle, but are more expensive.

Next you'll want a fuse block to properly dispatch power to your equipment. Don't forget a ground bus bar with a properly sized grounding wire and a proper ground point to minimize voltage drop. I usually try to avoid grounding to the frame when I install new equipment, I'd rather close the loop back at the bus bar to insure the least resistance.


Thanks very much for the detailed description. And, wow, I second ern-diz's comment about your clean install!

One of the maintenance items I adopted several years ago is to check the main electrical connections and grounds. I had quite a bit of electronics in my old Dodge grand Caravan and annually I would pull the grounds and alternator/battery leads, block to chassis, battery to frame etc, lightly sand them, reattach and then apply a thick rust proofing compound on top. I often conducted a voltage drop test on both the + and - sides before cleaning and after the cleaning and I would see decreased resistance. Generally things would work much better after cleaning all the contact points. It would eliminate slight headlight dimming when the rad fans came on for example. I also check my amp grounds on occasion too.

From the comments, I'm pretty sure that I'll be ok with the stock alternator. I may however consider, as mentioned, a Big 3 upgrade as it's inexpensive and probably generally good for the electrical system as a whole. If I start to notice any electrical anomolies, I'll consider doing an amp draw test and if need be pick up and install one of the 140 amp alternators.
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Old 04-13-2018, 07:54 PM   #35
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06YarisRS - to answer your question, yes, running the stock alternator. Haven't had a problem with any 1-2 amp systems I've ran in any of my cars.

David C - That is one clean install, my friend.
Thanks! I'm definitely feeling more confident about running stock.
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