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Old 08-11-2018, 03:13 PM   #1
vaironl
 
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All manual to mostly all automatic features conversion question

Hello all,

So for a long time, years actually, I have thought about converting my locks, windows, and possibly mirrors to be powered. My 2010 Toyota Yaris is all manual in every sense of the word and it's annoying when it comes to locking my doors and when it starts raining and I've had the windows down. The only thing from stopping me earlier on was the lack of experience, also space to work was limited. Now that I have a bit of both I wanted to ask what the users here would recommend I get started with.

From what I understand aftermarket parts are available for all of these, but I recall reading that aftermarket powered mirrors would stop working after some time, thus is better to go to a junkyard. Any other tips would be highly appreciated.
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Old 08-11-2018, 06:46 PM   #2
ex-x-fire
 
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Mines is all manual and wouldn't want it any other way.
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Old 09-11-2018, 01:15 AM   #3
vaironl
 
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Hello Everyone,

I am about to wire up my power windows. I bought a power window kit from A1electric, SPAL motors and SPAL 3 switch kit. Installing most of the hardware has been quite easy, figuring out wiring has been a bit more difficult, mostly because I do not want to blow a fuse and I also would like to prevent any future accidents, such as a wire coming lose or something worse happening. But the threads on this forum have helped a lot. To the actual questions…
The grey cable for the illumination will be connected to the brown wire from the dimmer rheostat. It seems they are different gauge values, but I have not been able to take a better look. What is the general rule of thumb here? Can I still just tap to the brown, thinner looking wire, without worrying much? The diagram does not show it needs a fuse or give any suggestions.
For the red cable, which needs 12V and has a 25A fuse, the SPAL wiring diagram shows a relay to be optional part of the process. It would be simpler to tap into an “accessory on” wire, but I am not sure if the relay is a better solution. Similar question as above, does the difference in gauge matter in this application?

Other more general questions….
To tap into the cables, I am considering using T-taps, it seems there have been debates most favoring soldering as a much better job if done well. I am not sure of how well I could solder, but have bought lots of wires to practice on. Would it be ok/safe to use t-taps until I can get my soldering skills improved and redo the wiring in a cleaner way a couple of months later?
Also, what is the best way to add the 25A inline fuse to the 12V red cable coming from the switch kit to the relay/accessory power connection. Buy inline fuse holders? Or just add female spade terminals to the wire
I am not in a rush, so am willing to learn and gather more knowledge. Just a couple of days ago I was a bit scared about the process, but after reading a decent amount of threads I am much more confident about the installation.
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Old 09-11-2018, 04:09 AM   #4
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To everyone in the future that might be in my same position, there are actually charts that help figure out wire gauge sizes needed dempeding on the Amperage being drawn.
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Old 09-11-2018, 02:03 PM   #5
ern-diz
 
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I had aftermarket power window switches and motors installed because I wanted power windows. I also had power door lock actuators installed and working off the alarm system. I've seen others retrofit things like OEM cruise control and power windows. Just need to dig into the forum with some searching.
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:17 PM   #6
Runethecursed
 
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I would have started with a junked touring model yaris, started yanking out parts from the door panels and seeing what I needed and gone from there, but I guess that works too. I'm a bit more comfortable with getting dirty in junkyards,
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Old 09-11-2018, 09:24 PM   #7
dogsridewith
 
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all manual and no rear wiper/washer 2 door hatch w/ no infotainment except a good radio.
would enjoy an electric actuator for passenger door window.
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Old 09-12-2018, 09:31 AM   #8
atomic_hoji
 
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+1 to Rune above - for those looking to make the addition in future, check for existing wiring (sometimes there, sometimes not..) and add-on using factory parts, then there's no issues with wire gauges, etc.. just plug n' play!

Quote:
Originally Posted by vaironl View Post
...
The grey cable for the illumination will be connected to the brown wire from the dimmer rheostat. It seems they are different gauge values, but I have not been able to take a better look. What is the general rule of thumb here? Can I still just tap to the brown, thinner looking wire, without worrying much? The diagram does not show it needs a fuse or give any suggestions.
For the red cable, which needs 12V and has a 25A fuse, the SPAL wiring diagram shows a relay to be optional part of the process. It would be simpler to tap into an “accessory on” wire, but I am not sure if the relay is a better solution. Similar question as above, does the difference in gauge matter in this application?

Other more general questions….
To tap into the cables, I am considering using T-taps, it seems there have been debates most favoring soldering as a much better job if done well. I am not sure of how well I could solder, but have bought lots of wires to practice on. Would it be ok/safe to use t-taps until I can get my soldering skills improved and redo the wiring in a cleaner way a couple of months later?
Also, what is the best way to add the 25A inline fuse to the 12V red cable coming from the switch kit to the relay/accessory power connection. Buy inline fuse holders? Or just add female spade terminals to the wire
I am not in a rush, so am willing to learn and gather more knowledge. Just a couple of days ago I was a bit scared about the process, but after reading a decent amount of threads I am much more confident about the installation.
The general rule of thumb that I use is not to use heavier gauges downstream of lighter gauges unless you REALLY know what's what. Supplies should be the heavier gauge to carry all the supplied loads, then loads coming off gauged properly for each device. That said, also don't assume a larger wire is a heavier gauge if using non-OEM wire - "off-the-shelf" wire may meet different specs and may have the same gauge wire inside, but have a thicker insulation; e.g. "trailer" wire that is easily found, and cheap, at the local auto shop. That's my $0.02 anyway.. lol

If you're in doubt of a supply wire, fusing, etc.. you may find it easier (well, a pain in the butt, but less worrisome) to run a dedicated, fused supply wire from the battery - depending if you need constant power or not, this may need to go through a relay energized by a 12V IGN line to avoid draining your battery..

As for "T-taps" (or wire taps in general) they work; crimped connections work; soldering works.. I chose to solder on my wire harness when I needed to convert connector types - I needed to change some wire terminals, etc.. - and found I am a barbarian at soldering, however the connections are all solid. I have had the occasional issue with crimped connections slipping, so if you go that way ensure they're good and tight; not an expert with crimped connections either by any means.. Either way, adding a fuse holder inline (solder or crimped butt connector) works a treat, I would be hesitant to use removable connectors in case of them coming loose, but I'm sure it would work.

Keep us posted how you make out and good luck!
-- Adam
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Old 09-12-2018, 11:41 PM   #9
vaironl
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ern-diz View Post
I had aftermarket power window switches and motors installed because I wanted power windows. I also had power door lock actuators installed and working off the alarm system. I've seen others retrofit things like OEM cruise control and power windows. Just need to dig into the forum with some searching.
Agree! I am very inpatient and this project has taught me the importance of being patient. I just like messing with things and learning on my own, but I quickly found out how horrible of an idea that was. I went through several threads in the forum, youtube videos, and the basics of electronics and am much more comfortable with the process. Getting a quote for the installation from a shop boosted my motivation right back up too .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Runethecursed View Post
I would have started with a junked touring model yaris, started yanking out parts from the door panels and seeing what I needed and gone from there, but I guess that works too. I'm a bit more comfortable with getting dirty in junkyards,

I am thinking about going this route to install a latch that hooks up to the system. I pick up family at the airport several times a year and turning the car off, to open and close the trunk gets very annoying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by atomic_hoji View Post
+1 to Rune above - for those looking to make the addition in future, check for existing wiring (sometimes there, sometimes not..) and add-on using factory parts, then there's no issues with wire gauges, etc.. just plug n' play!



The general rule of thumb that I use is not to use heavier gauges downstream of lighter gauges unless you REALLY know what's what. Supplies should be the heavier gauge to carry all the supplied loads, then loads coming off gauged properly for each device. That said, also don't assume a larger wire is a heavier gauge if using non-OEM wire - "off-the-shelf" wire may meet different specs and may have the same gauge wire inside, but have a thicker insulation; e.g. "trailer" wire that is easily found, and cheap, at the local auto shop. That's my $0.02 anyway.. lol

If you're in doubt of a supply wire, fusing, etc.. you may find it easier (well, a pain in the butt, but less worrisome) to run a dedicated, fused supply wire from the battery - depending if you need constant power or not, this may need to go through a relay energized by a 12V IGN line to avoid draining your battery..

As for "T-taps" (or wire taps in general) they work; crimped connections work; soldering works.. I chose to solder on my wire harness when I needed to convert connector types - I needed to change some wire terminals, etc.. - and found I am a barbarian at soldering, however the connections are all solid. I have had the occasional issue with crimped connections slipping, so if you go that way ensure they're good and tight; not an expert with crimped connections either by any means.. Either way, adding a fuse holder inline (solder or crimped butt connector) works a treat, I would be hesitant to use removable connectors in case of them coming loose, but I'm sure it would work.

Keep us posted how you make out and good luck!
-- Adam
Thank you for providing this piece of advice! I added a relay which is only active when the key is in the accessories on position. Initially I tried wiring the relay & separately wire it to the brown cable on the dimmer rheostat, which worked and for whatever reason it wouldn't afterward. The windows would only work when the headlight was on . I did connect the illumination to the accessory on cable (green cable), and am not sure if it's a good idea, since I have heard I don't want to add a lot of load to existing wiring except for a relay, etc. Thus far it feels very rewarding to see the windows work. I roll them up and down for no reason now lol.
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Old 09-13-2018, 08:28 AM   #10
dogsridewith
 
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Don't even touch anything to do w/ the Yaris lamp(s )that dim off on their own...they're part of Hal and people have caused major problems with them.
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Old Yesterday, 02:15 AM   #11
vaironl
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dogsridewith View Post
Don't even touch anything to do w/ the Yaris lamp(s )that dim off on their own...they're part of Hal and people have caused major problems with them.
I was assuming if done right the illumination of the switch would change along with the illumination of my dash. If I am not incorrect one of those cables changes voltage as you adjust it and I thought I tapped into the right one. Oh well, I tried... I failed... I taped it back up.

I just installed the passenger window, power locks, and the Avital keyless entry system. I still cannot believe I was able to wire everything mostly on my own. I guess with some time and reading truly a lot can be accomplished.

First I tested the power locks on their own, then with the power windows, then everything together with the keyless entry. Works like a charm. That was time consuming but not too bad, what is difficult though is the wiring... My wires are not well sorted, as in they are all a big mess under the steering wheel and to sort them properly I would have to disassemble most of them. For now all wires I'm using are wrapped up with electrical tape and I also made sure no wires were rubbing with moving parts.

Does anyone know for how long this will last and how early I might see potential failures? I am assuming soldering will just be the way to go long term, but unfortunately school and work are taking a lot more time than initially thought and continuing to work on the car is becoming very difficult.

General tips on how to tidy up the wires and make everything last longer, not already mentioned here, would be greatly appreciated!
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