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Old 09-07-2011, 10:13 PM   #1
nemobile
 
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[Question] Wiring? Soldering or using Quick Splice Tap Connectors?

Hi.

I am trying to add 2 more power sockets in my 09 Yaris Sedan.
I bought a power socket from Autozone, and it came with those quick splice tap connectors.

It seems easier to use them because I don't have to solder wires or anything.
However some people say that it's not weatherproof and it gets loose and weak.

I am not sure what to do.
Do you have any suggestion?
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Last edited by nemobile; 09-11-2011 at 10:16 PM.
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Old 09-08-2011, 06:50 AM   #2
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solder is the strongest bet and best connection, you need to use proper amount of heat so you don't damage the wires - you also need to know how to solder, but of skill.
T-Taps work great, I've never had an issue with them - as for weather proof - it's inside the car isn't it ? you could always wrap it with self vulcanizing tape, also known as bi-seal.

last, you're adding 2 more power sockets to the car, I assume you're tapping off the same wire powering the factory socket. be careful not to overload the circuit or you'll blow the fuse, and don't just put a higher rated fuse in so that you can use all 3 at once. hope that helps.
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:31 AM   #3
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Yeah, if it's inside the car, use T-taps. Remember, the small wires need red ones! I use them all the time, and have NEVER had a problem with them.
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Old 09-08-2011, 05:41 PM   #4
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I used a T tap to acces the tach signal from the OBD-II as it is low current and there have been no problems.

Hovever, personally I would feel more comfortable soldering/using a more solid connection if the app was high current draw like a full 12v/higher amp outlet, etc.
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRide View Post
I used a T tap to acces the tach signal from the OBD-II as it is low current and there have been no problems.

Hovever, personally I would feel more comfortable soldering/using a more solid connection if the app was high current draw like a full 12v/higher amp outlet, etc.
Actually it is just the opposite. Mechanical connections are better for high current as solder connections, unless done perfectly will fail over time. On a product that I used to work on, that had a 24 Volt, 100 Amp hour battery pack, we experienced many failures with professionally soldered connections for our battery packs. When we met with the manufacturer of the connectors regarding the failure, they explained that on a properly crimped connection more contact occurs between the wire strands than with a soldered connection, where the solder coating the strands forms a bi-metal junction between strands.
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:28 PM   #6
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^ ^ ^ ^
Actually, a mechanical connection in a snap on T connector will fail quicker in many app due to vibrations such as in a car.
One has no idea how secure/complete a connection is made with them in contrast to a proper crimp connector such as a spade or ring, etc.

However, you are correct that it still can be better than a poor solder joint.

I should have added in my OP that I'm a great at soldering and have a long background assembling electronic audio kits, etc and related soldering. So, I am a bit biased.

Anyway, I'm shure you will agree that a good mechanical connection should always first be made (whenever possible) before soldering any wires and we are taling about 12v and much lower amps.

Last edited by RedRide; 09-08-2011 at 08:42 PM.
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Old 09-09-2011, 06:23 AM   #7
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32 years of experience building electronics with space and military applications here. In the 70s and 80s for NASA work, hand soldering was considered the way to go. Then gradually mechanical (crimping) began to gain favor to the point where it is now considered as good.

Of course that is BS. In reality a properly done connection accomplished either way is better than another done poorly. If done right you are good. If done poorly you are screwed no matter how it is done.

Reliablity is a potitical issue, not a scientific one. The big guns carry the blame for failure in the industry. So they use statistics to "cover their ass" rather than listen to a grunt like me who really knows!

Just my biased personal opinion resulting from decades of service under the lash of course!
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:37 PM   #8
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Let's not loose site of the fact that the OP asked which is better for a power outlet....... a cheap snap-on (not crimpimed) T connetor vs a solderd connection?

I fear that he is even more unsure about what to do by now.
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Old 09-09-2011, 01:56 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRide View Post
Let's not loose site of the fact that the OP asked which is better for a power outlet....... a cheap snap-on (not crimpimed) T connetor vs a solderd connection?

I fear that he is even more unsure about what to do by now.
I have used those connectors and they work fine. Uhaul used them on the harness wiring on my car once when I had to rent a trailer in an emergency. Could be a liability issue for them on a commercial scale if they didnt work and caused them to get sued.

So I have the believe they are OK.
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Old 09-11-2011, 10:15 PM   #10
nemobile
 
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Thank you guys for your opinions and experiences. :)

The Quick T-Tap connector was too big for the positive wire, so I decided to do both soldering and crimping.

I managed to solder T-Taping part and to crimp a ring terminal for a ground wire. I used to do soldering in high school, and it was fun remembering the memories while screwing up the wires a couple times. and heat shrink products were fun to play with!

I learn things in hard way.
First, I bought rubber electrical tape, not vinyl one. Turned out the tape was too thick. I wasn't sure if Vinyl tape would stand NYC weather.
- Lesson learned: Know what you are going to buy!
Second, the first ring terminal was too small for a bolt that screws into the car body. I had to make another visit to Autozone for bigger ones.
- Lesson learned: Know what exactly you need!
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Old 09-11-2011, 10:31 PM   #11
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Vibration in a vehicle is the factor here. Solder joints work fine in fixed connections (stereos, etc), but if there is motion, crimp is better. I used to prove this to my apprentices by soldering one connector, crimping another. Clamp them in a vise, count how many times one can bend the solder joint before it just snaps off, but youi can really get bored bending a crimp back and forth before it fails.

Years ago, I used to be able to find insulated studs for high power connections, fastened to the body with a screw. Loop terminals were used on the wires, and spray coating finished the job. Never a failure in our production machines.
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Old 09-11-2011, 11:57 PM   #12
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Again I believe the OP is refering to a "snap on" connector not a crimp type connection.
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:43 PM   #13
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I assume the "snap" connector is the little plastic job with the blade that cuts into both wires either in parallel or as a tee, right? I have used these before, and had no trouble with either, BUT...

I didn't depend on just the pressure of the cover to make the connection, I used linesman's pliers on the blade before snapping the cover into place.
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