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Old 06-17-2009, 08:33 AM   #127
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I just wish my Yaris had a larger gas tank. 15 gallons would have made a tremendous difference. 11 gallons isn't really large enough. 20 gallons would have made it have a tremendous range!
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Old 06-17-2009, 01:34 PM   #128
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Originally Posted by Woody_Woodchuck View Post
56 mpg is fantastic, congratulations! Seems to me you will be the first to break the 650 mile tank or 60 mpg tank barrier also!!!

Iím still fighting to match your 50+ mpg tank streak. Donít worry, my evil plan is to not match it but SMASH it altogether. A tank over 55 mpg for me is going to take some drastic hypermiling techniques and lots of lucky commutes. Not impossible but very unlikely with my terrain and commute traffic. Heck, last night on the way home traffic was so heavy I had to drive the speed limit and could not get any coasting in for the first 20 miles. Managed to just break 50 mpg for the 30 miles, average is around 54 mpg.

Keep up the great work and keep raising the bar higher.

On a side note: Getting the average numbers for speed versus impg is going to take a while. There are only a couple flat sections on my commute and with the recent traffic I will not be able to get any standard down. Iíll get them, just going to take a while is all.
Thanks Woody and I watch with anticipation for the day when you SMASH my streak!

650 miles, I don't know if it's possible, but I have a long trip coming up where hopefully it won't prove too hilly to test the limits of this car. I feel 100% confident I could break 60 if I had a MT, but I don't know if it can be done with an AT with no P&G at hwy speeds.
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Old 06-27-2009, 01:23 PM   #129
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I just wish there was that one magical thing I could add to my Yaris that would get it to 50mpg~!

Http://sniperfp10.googlepages.com
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Old 07-11-2009, 10:34 PM   #130
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I decide to start keeping track of my fuel economy. My first result is 31 mpg. My driving has been both Interstate and city driving. I plan to start using the fuel economy choice upon my Garmin nuvi 255WT. Since I have not noticed the fuel economy choice on my nuvi before, I wonder the fuel economy option was added when I updated my nuvi's software through my computer.
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Old 07-12-2009, 12:02 AM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellenbetty View Post
I decide to start keeping track of my fuel economy. My first result is 31 mpg. My driving has been both Interstate and city driving. I plan to start using the fuel economy choice upon my Garmin nuvi 255WT. Since I have not noticed the fuel economy choice on my nuvi before, I wonder the fuel economy option was added when I updated my nuvi's software through my computer.
So how does that work? Do you reset the odometer on the Garmin to zero when you fuel up the car, then punch in the amount of gas you put in the next time?

As I don't run my GPS all the time, it is a useless function for me. And considering that you can easily computer your MPG when you fill up your tank by dividing the number of miles driven by the gallons of gas you put in to fill it up again, it is easy to do manually. I keep a log in my Palm Pilot, and if by chance I don't have it with me I simply get a receipt and note how many miles I got out of the tank.
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Old 07-16-2009, 06:56 PM   #132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STANGER45 View Post
I just wish there was that one magical thing I could add to my Yaris that would get it to 50mpg~!

Http://sniperfp10.googlepages.com
That link brought me to a site with a Trojan on it, just letting you know.
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Old 07-17-2009, 09:43 PM   #133
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Originally Posted by orheen View Post
I have a toyota yaris 1.0 My fuel comsumption record is 60 MPG !!! = 3.9 liter / 100km
That is awesome, orheen! I always wondered what could be done with the 1.3L and 1.0L gasoline engines. I often wish that they were available in North America.
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Old 07-18-2009, 08:07 AM   #134
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i installed a K&N SRI and my average is 7.5 L / 100 km with aggressive driving
is that good ?
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Old 07-24-2009, 11:00 PM   #135
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMax View Post
So how does that work? Do you reset the odometer on the Garmin to zero when you fuel up the car, then punch in the amount of gas you put in the next time?
I have been using the ecometer's fuel averaging system.

I sometimes use the Yaris built in trip meter to get miles driven when refueling to figure out mpg.

I have two ecometers, one for each Yaris. The 'fastest route' involving driving on the US Interstate system gets slightly better fuel economy than driving the 'most economical' route.

Next test will involve 'shortest route' to compare mpg. According to what I can tell, the Garmin follows the natural flow of water down or up hill when I select the 'fuel economical' route for the Yaris.
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Old 07-28-2009, 04:31 PM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BailOut View Post
That is awesome, orheen! I always wondered what could be done with the 1.3L and 1.0L gasoline engines. I often wish that they were available in North America.

Yess it's like a joke. My last record of fuel consumption is 65 MPG!!! = 3.6 L / 100 km. I know its unbeliviable but air turbulance does everything possible

I made it with 3 men in car (included me)
I think Toyota yaris 1.0 is more misery than prius
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Old 10-21-2009, 12:02 PM   #137
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Breaking 50 MPG

Scangauge II said I was at 52.6 MPG when I left the freeway. By the time I got home it was down to 52.4. After a morning trip through red stop lights in the city I bought gas and the actual MPG by then was just under 50--which was consistent with the Scangauge number. So I am convinced I was well over 50 on the highway.

The trip was from near Burlington, VT (Taft's Corner) to Boston (Somerville), with one stop for tolls and another immediately after to close the fuel fill that somehow was not latched. Dry roads (wet kills mileage), 2007, stock USA hardware, 1.5L engine, 4-door, 5-speed with 11K miles on it. No passenger (to add weight nor for me to annoy). Trunk was not empty. GPS with vertical speed displayed. External GPS and Sirius antennas adding a smidge of drag. Headlights on, AC off.

How did I do it? I am not sure. I am still learning. Every few miles I seem to adjust my strategy.

I have my gauge display showing:

MPG TPS
AVG MPH


Here is my current guess about what I was doing:

- Plan ahead so as to never hit the brake. (If I must brake for safety, yes, I brake.)

- Once I am on the highway, I never use anything but 5th gear unless I need to accelerate out of trouble, if something slows the traffic too much, etc. Low gears offer power and acceleration, but are not good for mileage.

- Try to go at least 55 MPH. First, going too slowly is scary, other cars don't expect it. Second, idling the engine buys me no distance, so even when coasting, I want to go fast enough to amortize that overhead.

- Don't invest unnecessary gasoline in going too fast, because the wind resistance will go up. If I know there is a long downhill that will get me going fast, I don't waste gas on cresting the top of the hill any faster than I need to to be safe in traffic.

- When I need a little braking (maybe on a long downhill) I take my foot off the clutch and watch MPG display 9999. Instead of wasting my speed on heating up the brake pads, I can use a little of it to run the engine at idle with no gasoline consumption. However, that 9999-display is not my friend unless I need a little braking. Otherwise I coast with the clutch down.

- When on the flat I pulse-and-glide: do a pulse throttle between 25 and 30 (the TPS number). Towards the end of my drive yesterday I was thinking a throttle of 25 is better, but I didn't have much flat left at that point. For the pulse I accelerate to about 63 MPH (because of display lag, I usually end up hitting 64), then I put my foot on the clutch for the glide and coast down to 57 MPH before hitting the gas for the next pulse (again, because of lags my speed will usually fall to about 55 before I speed up).

- Drive the hills. Watch the GPS vertical speed display to know if I am currently going up or down, look ahead to see whether the road bends up or down. Be strategic and try to use gas to go uphill and gravity to go downhill.

- Drive the traffic. Not just for safety, but for good mileage. I always need to know who is in front of me and who is in front of them and whether they are slowing or speeding up. I always need to know who is behind me, approaching or following or getting annoyed by me and looking to pass, and who is behind them. I need to know who is in lanes next to me and what they are doing. Anticipation is key and to anticipate I need to be very observant of the current situation. To get good mileage I need to be more aware of traffic not less. Watching my gauges is only part of the task.

- When going uphill the "glide" part of pulse-and-glide doesn't work so well, so if the hill wasn't too steep, I did "pulse-and-go-easy". The pulse would be a throttle of 25 and the "go-easy" would be maybe a throttle 20 or 21--but at that point I am really watching the current MPG and speed, by pulling off on the gas I can get a bigger MPG number. I won't see the 200+ MPG of coasting at high speed, but I can see my go-easy MPG go up to maybe 50-something. The pulse MPG would maybe in the low 30s (depending on the hill). That makes for an uphill average that isn't so bad. (And any downhill on the other side will still be great.)

- If the uphill is too steep, I do one long pulse, keep my speed high enough to not be dangerous, watch the current MPG, and frantically wonder whether there is something I can do differently to use less gas.

- Pretend I have a passenger whom I don't want to annoy, even if I am alone--smooth use of the clutch and gas saves clutch and gas.


Proviso: Pay attention to driving! When I wanted to find another radio station, my mileage fell--this kind of driving requires concentration; it is a good way to fight boredom on a long boring drive, it is not something to do instead of driving safely. Make sure you are comfortable with the operation of your car. If traffic or weather distracts, pay attention to the traffic and weather. Getting in an accident is terrible for your mileage.


My guess is that getting over 50 MPG on the highway is quite doable in good conditions, but it seems touchy enough that I think I am near the edge of what is practical.


A couple questions are bouncing around in my mind:

- What is the most efficient throttle setting for this engine?
Is throttle ("TPS") the right parameter to watch?, or should I be looking at load ("LOD")?? Is there a single answer to this "most efficient" question, or are there complications I am missing? I am thinking this is how hard to pulse, is that correct, what are the exceptions? Is there a practical way to answer this question by being "all scientific" and measuring actual engine efficiency?
- It seems I can spend gas to (1) move on the flat, (2) invest in additional speed, i.e., accelerate (which can be cashed in by coasting), and (3) invest in altitude, i.e., climb a hill (which can be cashed in by going downhill). Does this cover it? Am I missing something here?

- Given that I don't have a Prius, how can I get vaguely good mileage in the city?
As bad a braking is, I suspect that starting from a dead stop is the real killer. What is the best way to start from 0 MPH?
I'll try to remember to follow up with new numbers next I get in some highway driving.


Thanks,


-kb, the Kent who is wondering how much this kind of driving can become automatic and so let him again tune the radio.


P.S. I have only had this car for a couple thousand miles, I still need to check the tires. I plan to over inflate them a little, maybe up to 37 PSI vs. the standard 32 (is it?), it will be interesting to see how much that helps. ... Checking them now I notice they are currently not even inflated to factory spec, so I might have some significant room for improvement here.
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Old 10-21-2009, 03:23 PM   #138
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Dude, go here: http://cleanmpg.com/

You can find lots of existing discussion about all these issues and more, and people who just LOVE to talk about hypermiling techniques.
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Old 11-20-2009, 03:52 PM   #139
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http://yaris.rforum.biz/english-gene...ncy-i-t647.htm

Europe yaris 1.3 fuel usage lost

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Old 11-23-2009, 04:20 AM   #140
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i live in the Philippines and its very hard to go above 23mpg because of the traffic here.. :(
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Old 11-23-2009, 06:08 AM   #141
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovely09 View Post
The standard ways to improve fuel economy include not accelerating too quickly,planning your route so that you hit as few traffic lights as possible and not driving too fast.
I also live in the Philippines and yes,it is sometimes hard to achieve high gas mileage due to traffics mostly on rush hour.

im already very light footed. but max i can get for city driving is 10.7 km/l (30.28mpg) and 18 km/l (51 mpg) for highway driving
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Old 11-23-2009, 08:28 AM   #142
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Right on!

BailOut, I can't help but ask when's the last time you tore down an engine? You seem to know quite a bit about how they work and how to get the best fuel mileage.
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Old 11-23-2009, 08:54 AM   #143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kentborg View Post
Breaking 50 MPG

Scangauge II said I was at 52.6 MPG when I left the freeway. By the time I got home it was down to 52.4. After a morning trip through red stop lights in the city I bought gas and the actual MPG by then was just under 50--which was consistent with the Scangauge number. So I am convinced I was well over 50 on the highway.

The trip was from near Burlington, VT (Taft's Corner) to Boston (Somerville), with one stop for tolls and another immediately after to close the fuel fill that somehow was not latched. Dry roads (wet kills mileage), 2007, stock USA hardware, 1.5L engine, 4-door, 5-speed with 11K miles on it. No passenger (to add weight nor for me to annoy). Trunk was not empty. GPS with vertical speed displayed. External GPS and Sirius antennas adding a smidge of drag. Headlights on, AC off.

How did I do it? I am not sure. I am still learning. Every few miles I seem to adjust my strategy.

I have my gauge display showing:

MPG TPS
AVG MPH


Here is my current guess about what I was doing:

- Plan ahead so as to never hit the brake. (If I must brake for safety, yes, I brake.)

- Once I am on the highway, I never use anything but 5th gear unless I need to accelerate out of trouble, if something slows the traffic too much, etc. Low gears offer power and acceleration, but are not good for mileage.

- Try to go at least 55 MPH. First, going too slowly is scary, other cars don't expect it. Second, idling the engine buys me no distance, so even when coasting, I want to go fast enough to amortize that overhead.

- Don't invest unnecessary gasoline in going too fast, because the wind resistance will go up. If I know there is a long downhill that will get me going fast, I don't waste gas on cresting the top of the hill any faster than I need to to be safe in traffic.

- When I need a little braking (maybe on a long downhill) I take my foot off the clutch and watch MPG display 9999. Instead of wasting my speed on heating up the brake pads, I can use a little of it to run the engine at idle with no gasoline consumption. However, that 9999-display is not my friend unless I need a little braking. Otherwise I coast with the clutch down.

- When on the flat I pulse-and-glide: do a pulse throttle between 25 and 30 (the TPS number). Towards the end of my drive yesterday I was thinking a throttle of 25 is better, but I didn't have much flat left at that point. For the pulse I accelerate to about 63 MPH (because of display lag, I usually end up hitting 64), then I put my foot on the clutch for the glide and coast down to 57 MPH before hitting the gas for the next pulse (again, because of lags my speed will usually fall to about 55 before I speed up).

- Drive the hills. Watch the GPS vertical speed display to know if I am currently going up or down, look ahead to see whether the road bends up or down. Be strategic and try to use gas to go uphill and gravity to go downhill.

- Drive the traffic. Not just for safety, but for good mileage. I always need to know who is in front of me and who is in front of them and whether they are slowing or speeding up. I always need to know who is behind me, approaching or following or getting annoyed by me and looking to pass, and who is behind them. I need to know who is in lanes next to me and what they are doing. Anticipation is key and to anticipate I need to be very observant of the current situation. To get good mileage I need to be more aware of traffic not less. Watching my gauges is only part of the task.

- When going uphill the "glide" part of pulse-and-glide doesn't work so well, so if the hill wasn't too steep, I did "pulse-and-go-easy". The pulse would be a throttle of 25 and the "go-easy" would be maybe a throttle 20 or 21--but at that point I am really watching the current MPG and speed, by pulling off on the gas I can get a bigger MPG number. I won't see the 200+ MPG of coasting at high speed, but I can see my go-easy MPG go up to maybe 50-something. The pulse MPG would maybe in the low 30s (depending on the hill). That makes for an uphill average that isn't so bad. (And any downhill on the other side will still be great.)

- If the uphill is too steep, I do one long pulse, keep my speed high enough to not be dangerous, watch the current MPG, and frantically wonder whether there is something I can do differently to use less gas.

- Pretend I have a passenger whom I don't want to annoy, even if I am alone--smooth use of the clutch and gas saves clutch and gas.


Proviso: Pay attention to driving! When I wanted to find another radio station, my mileage fell--this kind of driving requires concentration; it is a good way to fight boredom on a long boring drive, it is not something to do instead of driving safely. Make sure you are comfortable with the operation of your car. If traffic or weather distracts, pay attention to the traffic and weather. Getting in an accident is terrible for your mileage.


My guess is that getting over 50 MPG on the highway is quite doable in good conditions, but it seems touchy enough that I think I am near the edge of what is practical.


A couple questions are bouncing around in my mind:

- What is the most efficient throttle setting for this engine?
Is throttle ("TPS") the right parameter to watch?, or should I be looking at load ("LOD")?? Is there a single answer to this "most efficient" question, or are there complications I am missing? I am thinking this is how hard to pulse, is that correct, what are the exceptions? Is there a practical way to answer this question by being "all scientific" and measuring actual engine efficiency?
- It seems I can spend gas to (1) move on the flat, (2) invest in additional speed, i.e., accelerate (which can be cashed in by coasting), and (3) invest in altitude, i.e., climb a hill (which can be cashed in by going downhill). Does this cover it? Am I missing something here?

- Given that I don't have a Prius, how can I get vaguely good mileage in the city?
As bad a braking is, I suspect that starting from a dead stop is the real killer. What is the best way to start from 0 MPH?
I'll try to remember to follow up with new numbers next I get in some highway driving.


Thanks,


-kb, the Kent who is wondering how much this kind of driving can become automatic and so let him again tune the radio.


P.S. I have only had this car for a couple thousand miles, I still need to check the tires. I plan to over inflate them a little, maybe up to 37 PSI vs. the standard 32 (is it?), it will be interesting to see how much that helps. ... Checking them now I notice they are currently not even inflated to factory spec, so I might have some significant room for improvement here.

how did you do it ?

0) standard transmission > automatic as far as saving gas goes

1) it is downhill most the way

2) you had to have used an unfamiliar pump

3) I am guessing scangauge calibration was a wee bit in favor of high mpg
prove me wrong...tell me you measure your own gas and don't use pump handles

anyhow, that is a lot of mpg...and also believable but it is way to close to what is possible/impossible
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Old 11-30-2009, 01:42 AM   #144
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I am still getting above 50 MPG--on the highway. But I am pissed at winter gas.

Tonight, driving from St. Albams, VT to Boston (with one stop) my Scangauge II reported over 50 MPG, without my wife divorcing me for driving too slowly.

I have an idea that if I were to go through my gasoline logs (going back quite a few years, long before I had this Yaris) I would be able to spot when the winter gasoline comes and goes in New England, USA. I seem to have a recent mileage drop of over 2% that came from no where. Yes, there are lots of reasons for why winter mileage should be lower, but mostly winter hasn't more than suggested itself so far in 2009. I think the gasoline changed, my mileage dropped, it dropped by something looks like over 2%. (Too many variables to be precise.)

I have learned more about getting good mileage.

Coasting is good. Try something: On a clear, flat stretch of road with no traffic, get up to about 50 MPH, and coast. (Manual transmission, foot on the clutch, foot off the gas.) Your speed will drop, but once it hits around 40 MPH, it seems to hang in there so well, it takes nearly forever to get all the way down to 29 MPH. I am thinking that doing a pulse and glide regime in the 45-to-30 MPH range must be magical if one could only find the road/traffic to permit it. Or, put another way, going fast requires pushing a lot of air out of the way quickly, and that is expensive. Slower is better if you can avoid getting hit from behind.

Air in the tires is good. One day after parking the car for a couple days I noticed my mileage was running worse. (Scangauge II showing the way.) It seemed like something was dragging behind me. Guess what? I had a leak in one tire. I could see my low tire after parking for a long weekend.

Getting good mileage is work. Great for boring drives, but stay alert in city driving. I notice that I don't hear the content of podcasts with as much comprehension since I started trying to hit 55 MPG.

Wind patterns: Today I noticed that the car was dusty after parking for several days. After driving for an hour or so I stopped for gas. The dust still seemed uniform--except behind my Garmin GPS antenna above the windshield where it seems to have added some some turbulence that scrubbed the dust behind it. The Sirius antenna above the rear window (a sedan) is lower profile and had less of a pattern. I doubt it is a big difference in the total, but it all ads up. Maybe the day I wear out the GPS antenna plug I can find a new antenna with a lower profile.

Riding the hills. Yes, going net down hill is good for mileage, but a more honest way to do it is to average the level, but with hills. Rolling hills make it possible to pulse and glide without going so much slower than the rest of the traffic. Going somewhat slower than traffic is good, it keeps from annoying one car for too long, but going too slow is a way to get mashed by some V8 SUV with limited depth perception.

Limits: Highway driving means highway speeds. I am thinking that something in the lower 50s MPG is something a Yaris is quite capable of without going so slowly as to get killed in 70 MPH traffic.

-kb
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