Toyota Yaris Forums - Ultimate Yaris Enthusiast Site
 

 


 
Go Back   Toyota Yaris Forums - Ultimate Yaris Enthusiast Site > Technical Forums > DIY / Maintenance / Service
  The Tire Rack

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-17-2007, 10:23 PM   #1
BailOut
Steals terrorist's lunch
 
BailOut's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Reno, Nevada, USA
Posts: 1,325
Post DIY: Engine Grille Block

One of the main reasons that fuel efficiency drops in the cold months is because fuel doesn't burn as well in a cold environment. Your engine can't always keep itself warm, and when its temperature drops too low your ECU starts feeding even more fuel into it in order to force it to run at a higher RPM in an effort to generate more heat.

In order to stop this wasteful cycle many people block their engine grilles in the colder months in order to stop the flow of too-cold air into the engine area. My own rule of thumb is to block the upper grille when daytime temperatures are peaking at 65F, and also the lower grille when daytime temperatures are peaking at 55F. I also use an engine insulation blanket once daytime temperatures drop to 45, and I will post a DIY on that when that time comes.

Supplies:

6' x 1/2" foam pipe insulation, x2 = $4 total at any hardware store
8" PVC, UV-resistant zip ties, black, x30 = $4 at Radio Shack and other places

Total cost: $8


Tools:

Scissors
Wire cutters
Flathead screwdriver


Instructions:

1) The front bumper needs to be pulled forward far enough to get your hand behind it. To do this use a combination of a lot of finesse, your fingers, and the flathead screwdriver to remove the 5 push pins on top of the bumper, right underneath the hood's front edge.

2) Once those are out do the same thing with the 2 that are in the front wheel wells, at the rear edge of the bumper piece.

3) Use the scissors to cut the foam to fit, using only one half of the foam each time (cut it in half lengthwise to make a half-pipe). Shape it a bit if you desire.

4) Run zip ties into the grille, and then carefully reach behind the bumper to route them back through the grille towards the front.

5) Close the zip ties and tighten them just enough to keep the pieces in place without wiggling too much.

6) Use the wire cutters to trim the excess from the zip ties, then use the screwdriver to push on the zip tie's nodule backwards into the grille in order to hide it.


That's it!

The lower grille is done in the exact same fashion.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg supplies.jpg (167.3 KB, 4322 views)
File Type: jpg bumper_removal.jpg (176.4 KB, 4292 views)
File Type: jpg bumper_removal2.jpg (175.6 KB, 4294 views)
File Type: jpg upper_grill_blocked.jpg (80.0 KB, 4385 views)
__________________
- Brian

Share the Road


I often carry 2 carpool passengers and mountain bikes
or snowboards/skis over a 4,500 foot elevation difference.
Click the graphic above to see my detailed mileage logs.

Last edited by BailOut; 09-17-2007 at 11:29 PM.
BailOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 07:38 AM   #2
Meteorite Man
Passin' The Gas...Station
 
Meteorite Man's Avatar
 
Drives: Same As You But Different
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Taunton, Mass
Posts: 266
Send a message via Yahoo to Meteorite Man
Now it REALLY looks like a "BumperCar". The assumption of all that work would suggest you need some "padding" in the passenger's compartment too...Wouldn't want you to hurt yourself.

Get a sheet of that clear 3M stuff, cut it just a bit larger than the opening (trace the opening and add about 1 1/2" to the over all dimension) and then punch a few small holes (trace a half-dollar sized object) into it to allow SOME air to go in. It's clear, it blocks the air and it looks good. I've done it with a truck it had (diesel). That way I didn't cover up a custom grille and at the end of the season.....pull it off and toss it out.
__________________
MY Gas Station Attendant Misses Me...

Chuck
Meteorite Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 08:35 AM   #3
Chris07LB
Super Moderator
 
Chris07LB's Avatar
 
Drives: Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 3,177
It gets THAT cold in Reno??
Chris07LB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 08:49 AM   #4
BailOut
Steals terrorist's lunch
 
BailOut's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Reno, Nevada, USA
Posts: 1,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris07LB View Post
It gets THAT cold in Reno??
I commute over a mountain pass that takes 3 plows and the world's largest snow blower to keep open in the Winter, and it still shuts down sometimes. Each day I pass directly in front of my favorite ski area (Mount Rose) which causes me to use many vacation days.

10 minutes from my office is the Diamond ski area. 20 minutes past my office is Squaw Valley, where the Winter Olympics were held in 1964. 30 minutes in the other direction is Heavenly.

One of our friends that lives just down the road is the Marketing Director at the Kirkwood Ski Resort.

In other words, yes, it gets that cold here.
__________________
- Brian

Share the Road


I often carry 2 carpool passengers and mountain bikes
or snowboards/skis over a 4,500 foot elevation difference.
Click the graphic above to see my detailed mileage logs.

Last edited by BailOut; 09-18-2007 at 12:57 PM.
BailOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 08:50 AM   #5
Chris07LB
Super Moderator
 
Chris07LB's Avatar
 
Drives: Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 3,177
Makin' me cold just reading that.
Chris07LB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 11:49 AM   #6
PetersRedYaris
 
PetersRedYaris's Avatar
 
Drives: 2005 Scion xB
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: The Black Hills of South Dakota
Posts: 1,061
Surely there is a better looking option... Perhaps a power inverter with a space heater under your hood.

By the way, what is that on the front edge of your hood?
PetersRedYaris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 01:07 PM   #7
BailOut
Steals terrorist's lunch
 
BailOut's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Reno, Nevada, USA
Posts: 1,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by PetersRedYaris View Post
By the way, what is that on the front edge of your hood?
Do you mean the magnetic bra?
__________________
- Brian

Share the Road


I often carry 2 carpool passengers and mountain bikes
or snowboards/skis over a 4,500 foot elevation difference.
Click the graphic above to see my detailed mileage logs.
BailOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007, 02:27 PM   #8
Kaotic Lazagna
 
Kaotic Lazagna's Avatar
 
Drives: '14 GT86, '08 Vitz
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 9,562
haha, yup, it gets super cold in Reno.
Kaotic Lazagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2007, 12:07 PM   #9
BailOut
Steals terrorist's lunch
 
BailOut's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Reno, Nevada, USA
Posts: 1,325
Speaking of the weather here, it appears I got the grille block installed just in time. This is by no means anything close to what the mountain will look like in a few months when there are 6-12 foot tall snow banks on either side of the road, but today is only 09/20/2007.

Check out my drive over the mountain this morning:

7,000 feet:




7,500 feet:




8,000 feet:




9,000 feet:




With any luck my favorite ski areas will open early this season and I can try out my new snowboard.
__________________
- Brian

Share the Road


I often carry 2 carpool passengers and mountain bikes
or snowboards/skis over a 4,500 foot elevation difference.
Click the graphic above to see my detailed mileage logs.
BailOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2007, 02:31 PM   #10
pp.sweet
 
pp.sweet's Avatar
 
Drives: Red Yaris HatchBack
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sunny,Florida
Posts: 299
OMG...i feel for ya..dress warm,wear ya heavy sock,and keep some chicken soup in your thermost..Man I don't like winter..dont miss it one bit.
__________________
Don't hate. congratulate!!

wELCOME TO oUR wORLD..
pp.sweet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2007, 02:50 PM   #11
steved
Yaris Rules!!
 
Drives: 2007 Red Yaris Liftback a/t
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 201
I will probably take a carboard wrap in plastic and zip tie it on the inside of the grill.

I do this with my Echo and it works well. But will be harder to install on the Yaris
__________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made.
Groucho Marx (1890-1977)
steved is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2007, 12:47 AM   #12
PetersRedYaris
 
PetersRedYaris's Avatar
 
Drives: 2005 Scion xB
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: The Black Hills of South Dakota
Posts: 1,061
Quote:
Originally Posted by steved View Post
I will probably take a carboard wrap in plastic and zip tie it on the inside of the grill.

I do this with my Echo and it works well. But will be harder to install on the Yaris
Or you could just let your thermostat do what it's supposed to.

I've been thinking about this whole blocking the grill during the cold months and am a little pesimistic. Diesel trucks do it because they won't even warm up do to the oversizes cooling system, but our little Yarii have no trouble warming up. My heat was blazing hot last winter even when it was well below zero.

Perhaps the loss of mileage in the winter months is more due to the cold air entering the intake. Cooler/denser air means more fuel is added to maintain air/fuel ratios. In addition, drag is always increased due to wet, snowey, and/or slushy roads.

Bottom line, if your heater is putting out hot air, your engine is warm enough to operate efficiently.
PetersRedYaris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2007, 11:24 AM   #13
redyaris
Shiny Chromey Coolness
 
redyaris's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Toyota Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 982
Bailout props to you for your recent DIYs...You are the most interesting and devoted cause poster on this board.

I like your MacGyveresque approach. Taking simple tools and materials and applying to real world scenarios. May not look great but works i assume.
__________________
Bringin the Bling to Yarisworld
redyaris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2007, 02:13 AM   #14
KSIbucky
 
KSIbucky's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Yaris manual dark silver
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Fond du Lac, WI
Posts: 695
Send a message via AIM to KSIbucky Send a message via MSN to KSIbucky
I live in wisconsin and a padded blanket helps but i only put it on over night not while driving
__________________
7 Color Tach
Fujita Intake
Momo pedals Shift knob and boot. Full TRD SSK.
Blitz exhaust
Megan Lowering Springs
(Next is DC Header)
KSIbucky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 12:02 AM   #15
the_boss
 
the_boss's Avatar
 
Drives: 07 YARIS HATCH 5 DOOR
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Montreal Qc
Posts: 355
Send a message via MSN to the_boss
I know this tread is over 2 years old but does a piece of cardboard, and a can of black paint can do the trick as well?? put the cardboard behind the grill..maybe dunno..anyone tried?!
the_boss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 07:18 AM   #16
Yaris Hilton
Half a Bubble Off Plumb
 
Yaris Hilton's Avatar
 
Drives: 2009 Yaris Sedan
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA
Posts: 1,610
Smile

Look in the hypermiling section and on hypermiling sites like cleanmpg.com. Many people have improvised grill blocks, mainly looking for aerodynamic gains. As an earlier poster said, the thermostat keeps the engine warm anyway.
Yaris Hilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 10:19 AM   #17
BailOut
Steals terrorist's lunch
 
BailOut's Avatar
 
Drives: 2007 Yaris Liftback
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Reno, Nevada, USA
Posts: 1,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_boss View Post
I know this tread is over 2 years old but does a piece of cardboard, and a can of black paint can do the trick as well?? put the cardboard behind the grill..maybe dunno..anyone tried?!
That will work for a time but cardboard isn't waterproof, so sooner or later it will become weak and begin to warp. It is better to use a waterproof material.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaris Hilton View Post
As an earlier poster said, the thermostat keeps the engine warm anyway.
That is incorrect, and is also an oversimplification. The thermostat only controls when water circulates throughout the engine block and when it doesn't. In other words, it controls cooling rather than heating. Even with a closed thermostat the engine can find itself dumping heat rapidly in a cold environment. The ECU senses this through water temperature, the knock sensor and the O2 sensors. In this state the ECU causes the fuel system to run rich in order to create more waste heat, thereby using more fuel. A grille block alleviates this and can be seen in use in many vehicles, both commercial and personal, in northern climes (ever seen "Ice road Truckers"?).
__________________
- Brian

Share the Road


I often carry 2 carpool passengers and mountain bikes
or snowboards/skis over a 4,500 foot elevation difference.
Click the graphic above to see my detailed mileage logs.
BailOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 10:40 AM   #18
Yaris Hilton
Half a Bubble Off Plumb
 
Yaris Hilton's Avatar
 
Drives: 2009 Yaris Sedan
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA
Posts: 1,610
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by BailOut View Post
That is incorrect, and is also an oversimplification. The thermostat only controls when water circulates throughout the engine block and when it doesn't. In other words, it controls cooling rather than heating. Even with a closed thermostat the engine can find itself dumping heat rapidly in a cold environment. The ECU senses this through water temperature, the knock sensor and the O2 sensors. In this state the ECU causes the fuel system to run rich in order to create more waste heat, thereby using more fuel. A grille block alleviates this and can be seen in use in many vehicles, both commercial and personal, in northern climes (ever seen "Ice road Truckers"?).
Yes, it controls cooling. Yes, an engine will still give up heat through its surfaces when the coolant flow through the radiator is blocked. If you're running the heater in the car, as most people will in cold weather, that's a significant source of heat loss. A grill block might reduce the heat loss from the surfaces of the engine by reducing turbulent air flow in the engine compartment. That would have to be established by experiment. If someone with a Yaris and a Scangauge in a very cold climate wants to do some comparison tests with the grill blocked and unblocked under the same driving conditions at the same outside air temperature, please post your results. Blocking the airflow through the radiator will have no effect on the engine coolant temperature with the coolant flow through the radiator cut off. The heater will likely be the main route of heat exchange under those conditions. We all know the ECU controls the engine differently when the engine's cold. We don't know that a grill block will make a significant difference in its operation. I seriously doubt it. But if you want one, go for it!
Yaris Hilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY: Intake Installation redyaris DIY / Maintenance / Service 53 08-23-2014 05:34 AM
DIY: 10 minute engine bay detail Razr DIY / Maintenance / Service 60 04-15-2012 04:35 PM
DIY: Urethane Engine mounts turboyaris DIY / Maintenance / Service 1 05-21-2007 01:08 PM
swap for 2zz-ge???? yarisTOONR82 Performance Modifications 12 03-23-2007 07:15 PM
higher octane fuel KSIbucky DIY / Maintenance / Service 37 01-14-2007 08:17 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:16 PM.




YarisWorld
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.